Recent Research on Medical Marijuana

Humans have cultivated and consumed the flowering tops of the female cannabis plant, colloquially known as marijuana, since virtually the beginning of recorded history. Cannabis-based textiles dating to 7,000 B.C.E have been recovered in northern China, and the plant’s use as a medicinal and mood altering agent date back nearly as far. In 2008, archeologists in Central Asia discovered over two-pounds of cannabis in the 2,700-year-old grave of an ancient shaman. After scientists conducted extensive testing on the material’s potency, they affirmed, “[T]he most probable conclusion … is that [ancient] culture[s] cultivated cannabis for pharmaceutical, psychoactive, and divinatory purposes.”
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Chronic marijuana use is about as bad for your health as not flossing

Chronic marijuana use long-term is not associated with a raft of physical health problems, according to a new study, with one surprising exception: gum disease.
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Studies Show Cannabis Relieves Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

Observational studies show cannabis relieves motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Studies focused on cannabinoid-based treatments for Parkinson’s disease have been conducted since the seventies, due to the important number of patients suffering from the illness reporting an improvement of their symptoms following the consumption of cannabis.
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